Articles

Cajun Cuisine to try on your Jewish trips with Kosher River Cruise

by Ben Goodman ***
Cajun is a form of cooking identifying the French-speaking Acadian people deported by the British from Acadia in Canada to what is now called the Acadiana region of Louisiana. Cajun cuisine is sometimes ascribed to as a 'rustic cuisine,' which simply means the food is sourced from locally available ingredients, and preparation is relatively simple.

Cruise dinner

An authentic Cajun meal is usually a three-pot medley, with one pot dedicated solely to the main dish, one dedicated to steamed white rice, handmade sausages, or some sort of seafood dish, and the third containing whatever vegetable is plentiful or available during the season. Crawfish, shrimp, and andouille sausage are staple meats used in a variety of Cajun dishes.

Which one of these dishes are you willing to try on our Jewish trips down the Mighty Mississippi?

Crawfish or Shrimp Étouffée

There's nothing better in Louisiana during crawfish season! An étouffée is a stew-like sauce served over a bed of warm rice. This is a staple dish that's served all year round, but it's best in the spring when fresh crawfish are available. 

Jambalaya

Jambalaya is a favorite Louisiana-origin dish of Spanish, West African, and French influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. It uses the same techniques as Paella but uses heartier ingredients. You can walk into any restaurant in Louisiana and order a big bowl of Jambalaya to enjoy.

Seafood Gumbo

Hit it with a few douses of tabasco and this meal is ready to warm you up on a chilly southern night! Gumbo used to be made in cauldron sized pots for the community to share during parties and social gatherings. 

Maque Choux

Thought to be an amalgam of Creole and American Indian cultural influence, Maque choux is arguably the most popular side dish in the whole Southern region. Be careful; you don't want to stuff yourself with this delicious appetizer before you can get to your food.

Beignets

Technically, beignets don't count as a meal, but desserts have a special place in all Southern peoples hearts. They're the equivalent of french donuts dusted with powdered sugar. You can have them with your morning coffee or afternoon tea; they're just that good. 

Excited to learn more about the culinary treasures of the Cajun region on your Jewish tours? Book a tour now on Kosher River Cruise!


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About Ben Goodman Advanced    ***

35 connections, 2 recommendations, 211 honor points.
Joined APSense since, November 22nd, 2016, From Bicester, United Kingdom.

Created on Jul 9th 2019 01:19. Viewed 329 times.

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