Articles

A Detailed and Practical Guide to Understanding Female Squirting

by Samoa Origins Samoaorigins

The phenomenon of squirting, often depicted in adult films (in exaggerated manners), leaves many women curious about its authenticity. In reality, squirting can be a delightful part of sexual arousal, primarily associated with G-spot stimulation.

The volume of fluid released during squirting can differ significantly among women, manifesting as a mere trickle or a more substantial gush. Squirting can occur at any point during sexual activities – before, during, or after an orgasm.

Contents

  1. Learning to Squirt
  2. The Warmup Phase
  3. The Buildup Phase
  4. The Release Phase

Learning to Squirt

Squirting isn't a spontaneous act that can be commanded; it happens when a woman's body is adequately aroused and prepared for the fluid release. While some may find the concept of female ejaculation controversial or even taboo, the reality is that it's a genuine phenomenon that can enhance pleasure. The fluids discharged during squirting aren't urine but rather a lubricating secretion from the body's glands (akin to male ejaculation, sans sperm). This fluid originates from the urethral sponge, which is stimulated when the G-spot is aroused.

To achieve a state conducive to squirting, both partners should engage in extensive foreplay with slow, pressure-building movements. Following this, the woman should focus on stimulating her G-spot and clitoris to ensure sufficient fluid accumulation in her urethral sponge. This stimulation could come from various sources, such as finger penetration or the use of toys. Knowledge of the G-spot's location is crucial in this process, as it is typically located a few inches inside the vagina, identifiable as a spongy, elevated bump.

The Warmup Phase

Known also as female ejaculation or "gushing", female squirting refers to the discharge of clear, odorless fluid from the vulva in response to sexual stimulation and orgasm. This is not urine; instead, it results from the urethral glands and the surrounding "sponge" becoming engorged with blood. The sensation is often likened to urinating, but the fluid is typically watery and feels lighter. Squirting has been a recognized part of sexual activities for thousands of years, with mentions in ancient sex manuals like the Kama Sutra. However, many women remain oblivious to their ability to squirt and may be hesitant to experiment.

Priming the vulva through a warmup phase is key to achieving a successful squirt. This phase involves ensuring the clitoris and labia are fully engorged and the vagina is adequately lubricated from foreplay. Preparation also includes setting the mood, using lubricant, and ensuring the area is ready for the potential mess, possibly by laying down a towel or a waterproof throw.

The Buildup Phase

Achieving the squirting climax necessitates a buildup of tension, which is why foreplay plays a pivotal role. During this phase, a woman should practice techniques she's comfortable with while enjoying slow, intimate touches. A relaxed and highly aroused state is the ideal starting point for her squirting routine. She should engage in erotic thoughts about her partner and adopt a sensual mindset.

It's important for her to explore her vagina, identify the areas that provide the most pleasure, and communicate her findings with her partner. Understanding that not all women can squirt every time is also crucial. The pleasure derived from the attempt, even if unsuccessful, should be acknowledged.

The Release Phase

Those who are intrigued by squirting have likely watched adult film stars seemingly effortlessly discharge large volumes of liquid from their vulvas. Although some of these portrayals may be exaggerated, squirting is a genuine and erotically charged act.

Squirting occurs when a person with a vagina releases clear, watery fluid from the urethra during or shortly before an orgasm. The quantity can be significant enough to give some women the impression of having wet the bed, which is a sensation distinct from female ejaculation. The latter involves the discharge of a milky white substance containing spermicidal secretions or PSAs from the Skene's glands.

Researchers suggest that the fluid expelled during squirting is similar to urine, possibly containing small amounts of PSA. It's believed that some of the fluid might originate from the bladder, although it's unclear if this would happen during an orgasm.

Those new to squirting are advised to take things slowly and gradually work towards bigger and faster movements. Regardless of whether squirting is used as a means to achieve an orgasm or simply because it feels incredibly pleasurable, it's important to recognize it as a safe and healthy bodily function with no associated harm.


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Created on Jul 11th 2023 03:04. Viewed 142 times.

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