Articles

An Introduction To End-Of-Tenancy Cleaning: What Is It,

by Liz Seyi Digital marketing manager

It might seem self-explanatory what an end-of-tenancy clean is; it refers to the process at the end of a tenancy, when a given rental property is thoroughly deep-cleaned prior to the tenant moving out. 

However, if you have landed on this page after searching for information about end-of-tenancy cleaning, you might have a few questions about it. Those could include queries about whose responsibility it is to arrange for an end-of-tenancy clean, as well as what is typically contained in this process. 

So, let’s take you through answers to those questions. 

 What is involved in an end-of-tenancy clean? 

In many ways, end-of-tenancy cleaning simply involves the same kind of processes that might be involved in any other deep-clean of a property such as a flat, period property, or a commercial or industrial building. 

This means more-or-less anything and everything you might expect to be cleaned in such a property, can be cleaned – encompassing the likes of the carpets, floors, walls, appliances, furniture, and more. For what reasons might someone request cleaning at the end of a tenancy? 

With a tenant typically being expected to leave a property in the same condition it was in at the time the tenancy started, the goal of an end-of-tenancy clean is to return the given property to its ‘original’ state.  

A tenant failing to carry out a convincing deep clean of their property isn’t just ‘bad form’ or something that gives a poor impression, although that’s unfortunate enough, given that the tenant might well be counting on the landlord to give a good reference for future occasions when they may wish to rent a property. 

That’s because there’s also the fact that the landlord, if they are dissatisfied with the state the property is in at the end of the tenancy, can claim on the tenant’s deposit in order to rectify the situation. Indeed, you might well be reading this as a landlord in such a predicament.  

So, you can probably see why both landlords and tenants have good reason to seek to ensure a thorough end-of-tenancy clean. The tenant will not wish to lose any of their deposit if they can at all avoid this, while the landlord will undoubtedly be anxious to protect their investment, including making sure it is always in the best possible condition. 

And of course, both parties will want to avoid any prolonged dispute over the property’s cleanliness and the deposit, bearing in mind that if the disagreement is not resolved, the deposit adjudicators will have to come to a reasonable conclusion. That’s a situation that would be stressful to everyone. 

 

There’s no need to look further than Nationwide for your end-of-tenancy clean 

Whatever the specific circumstances in which you require end-of-tenancy cleaning – including whether you are a tenant or a landlord – you are likely to be highly thankful for a deep-cleaning service that really does provide a deep clean, for a competitive price. 

This is exactly what our team here at Nationwide would be pleased to provide you with. Using high-quality cleaning products and undertaking a true top-to-bottom clean of the property – encompassing the carpets, windows, hard surfaces, and all other key areas – to the most exacting professional standards, we can ensure the property for which you request an end-of-tenancy clean really is left looking ‘as good as new’. 

Would you like to explore the possibilities for taking advantage of this service from an innovative and renowned name in commercial cleaning, wherever your property is in the UK? If so, please don’t hesitate to request a quote from us today, and a professional from the Nationwide team will swiftly get back in touch with you. 

 

 


Sponsor Ads


About Liz Seyi Magnate I   Digital marketing manager

1,768 connections, 60 recommendations, 5,505 honor points.
Joined APSense since, March 14th, 2016, From London, United Kingdom.

Created on Apr 21st 2023 06:02. Viewed 65 times.

Comments

No comment, be the first to comment.
Please sign in before you comment.