Questions

Is LED Tube Lights is harmful for health?

Asked by Marcus Harris, in Home & Family

Answers

Bruce F. Senior   Entrepreneur
LED bulbs are much harder to break and use less energy than Compact Florescent Light Bulbs. CFL's contain mercury and LED's do not, but a 2010 Study in the Journal Environmental Science and Technology found that LEDs contain lead, arsenic and a few other potentially dangerous substances that are only released when the LED bulb is broken.
Jul 13th 2019 00:16   
Hussein Hegazy Junior  Limousine service
In 2016, the American Medical Association (AMA) said that LED technology may impact human health. LED lights emit light from the short-wave, high-energy blue and violet end of the visible light spectrum. This light range controls our sleep cycle and correct exposure is important to maintain our circadian rhythm. Little wonder that many people complain of itchiness, redness in the eyes and mild headaches after continuous exposure to LED lights. The AMA says that life-long exposure of the retina and lens to blue peaks from LEDs can increase the risk of cataract and age-related macular degeneration. Studies also reveal that light emitted by LEDs can cause retinal changes, if there is high exposure for even a short period of time.

A 2014 study published in Environmental Health Perspectives reported the adverse effects on the retina of rats due to chronic exposure to LED lights compared with other light sources that have less blue light. These researchers suggested a precautionary approach with regard to the use of blue-rich “white” LEDs for general lighting. Satya Karna, a consultant neuro-ophthalmologist with the Narayana Nethralaya, Bengaluru, says the lens and cornea have inherent ultraviolet light blocking, but with age some light, including blue peaks, can reach the retina and cause damage.
Jul 13th 2019 01:09   
Koderey Techstack Advanced  Digital Marketing Institute in Delhi
In 2016, the American Medical Association (AMA) said that LED technology may impact human health. LED lights emit light from the short-wave, high-energy blue and violet end of the visible light spectrum. This light range controls our sleep cycle and correct exposure is important to maintain our circadian rhythm. Little wonder that many people complain of itchiness, redness in the eyes and mild headaches after continuous exposure to LED lights. The AMA says that life-long exposure of the retina and lens to blue peaks from LEDs can increase the risk of cataract and age-related macular degeneration. Studies also reveal that light emitted by LEDs can cause retinal changes, if there is high exposure for even a short period of time.

A 2014 study published in Environmental Health Perspectives reported the adverse effects on the retina of rats due to chronic exposure to LED lights compared with other light sources that have less blue light. These researchers suggested a precautionary approach with regard to the use of blue-rich “white” LEDs for general lighting. Satya Karna, a consultant neuro-ophthalmologist with the Narayana Nethralaya, Bengaluru, says the lens and cornea have inherent ultraviolet light blocking, but with age some light, including blue peaks, can reach the retina and cause damage.
Jul 13th 2019 02:06   
Web digital Media Group Advanced  Web digital Media Group
Both above answer are absolutely Good!
Jul 13th 2019 07:02   
Zoya Sayedk Junior  SEO
I agree on above answers.
Jul 13th 2019 10:35   
Supplement Trade Advanced  Stay Healthy with us
Both above answer are absolutely Good!
Jul 14th 2019 04:04   
Ngàn Thông Advanced  Thiết Bị Sự Kiện
he tidings of LED bulbs have taken over the international lighting market with gusto and changed it unrecognizably. Lately, however, questions have been raised as to whether this type of lighting is, in fact, a revolutionary and beneficial one that does not bring disadvantages or health risks with it. We went out to check.
Jul 14th 2019 21:09   
Carlos Silva Magnate I   Affiliate Commissionist - Entertain and Biz
What can I say, you just said everything about Led lights, but we live that way, how to change some thing around us? And plastic?! Very urgent to stop with it! And all the rest ... our World is very seek, and we inside it, too ...
Jul 15th 2019 00:46   
Photo Portray Magnate III   Owner
I agree with BRUCE F. answer.
Jul 15th 2019 03:16   
Alice Jones Senior   Business Expert
I agree with Ngàn Thông....
Jul 15th 2019 03:52   
Auto HailCo Advanced  Auto Hail Repair Denver
Unlike other energy-efficient types of lighting, the LED bulb does not emit polluting radiation and therefore does not pose a health hazard. It is important to note that LED bulbs operate at low voltage and are therefore considered safe compared to any other lighting systems.
Jul 15th 2019 04:36   
Kaira Kapoor Professional  MBD Group
Answer given by bruce F. is correct
Jul 15th 2019 05:33   
Tru Automotive Advanced  Specialty Services for Your Performance Off-Road V
In light of the harmful effects of radiations from LEDs, many manufacturers ... The Indian LED lighting market was worth US $3.7 billion in 2016 and the sector ... But their health impacts have been largely out of public domain.
Jul 15th 2019 07:35   
Mike Bissell Freshman  Manager
One of the main concerns with LED lights relates to red LED lights, one of the oldest varieties still on the market. Those red LEDs were made with a substance called AGA (aluminum gallium arsenide), which is toxic in concentrated amounts. If you are directly exposed to this material on work sights or through contact with broken bulbs, it can be hazardous to your health. Side effects of toxicity from AGA include respiratory, kidney, and reproductive issues in laboratory studies. The lead content in red LEDs is also toxic when directly exposed, and should be avoided.

Red LEDs aren’t the only ones with issues: white LEDs contain high concentrations of nickel, which is an allergen for some people, as well as copper, which can be very detrimental to the environment if LED lights aren’t disposed of and handled properly. The use of heavy metals like these could potentially be avoided, and other compounds and substances could replace them, but that would also drive up the price, and as we know, the bottom line is often the biggest concern for manufacturers.

The good news is that direct exposure to these types of substances would require being present when the bulbs were broken, or directly inhaling the heavy-metal fumes from the breakage.

Construction sites and waste disposal areas are likely the most dangerous place for chronic or acute exposure, but even a broken bulb in a home or workplace could have serious side effects for people in the vicinity. Using protective material (mask and gloves) when cleaning up any broken LED light is highly recommended. While these are real risks, you can also avoid most of the danger by staying away from broken bulbs and being smart about cleaning up any potential accidents.
Jul 16th 2019 01:00   
Vanya Herbal Freshman  E-commerce Marketing
I agree on above answers.
Jul 16th 2019 02:28   
Saumya J. Junior  Content Marketer with 3 Year of Exp
No, I don't think so. They are energy saver.
Jul 16th 2019 06:34   
Argha Chatterjee Freshman  Blogger
Yes it's harmful. But they are also energy and money saver.
Jul 16th 2019 12:56   
Alice Jones Senior   Business Expert
I agree with Mike Bissell.......
Jul 17th 2019 02:57   
Al Basira Advanced  Best Aluminium and Glass Cont. Company In Dubai UA
In some cases, it is dangerous for health.
Jul 23rd 2019 01:52   
faii acy Magnate II   GPT Site Owner/Operator
Yes and no. While the answers given are true, they are missing one important fact. I copied this from scienceabc because I was too lazy to paraphrase it;

"Despite all of those slightly worrying aspects of LED lights, it is hard to forget that older lighting technologies were even more dangerous, with light bulbs exploding, fluorescent lights causing epileptic shocks, ultraviolet radiation exposure, and toxic fumes when bulbs were broken. LED lights do have their dangers, but with their high-efficiency, environmentally conscious design, and ever-decreasing price, it seems that LEDs are here to stay.

Just use some common sense regarding exposure, clean-up, and handling and you should be perfectly fine!"
Jul 26th 2019 14:31   
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