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Play fantasy T20 cricket

by Konita Dcosta I'm Authors

Umpire is a person who has the authority to make judgements on the cricket field, according to the laws of Test, 50 over and T20 cricket games. An umpire is not to be confused with the referee who usually presides only over international matches and makes no decisions affecting the outcome of the game.

Ideally, all those interested in umpiring, should attend a course on the Laws of the game run by an umpire’s association. The “New South Wales Umpires’ and Scorers Association” runs courses on the Laws and Technique of Umpiring twice a year and can, by arrangement, offer local courses on request. Cricket is incomplete without an umpire except for fantasy T20 cricket.

Traditionally, cricket matches have two umpires on the field, one standing at the end where the bowler delivers the ball (Bowler’s end), and one directly opposite the facing batsman (usually, but not always, at square leg). However, in the modern game, there may be more than two umpires; for example T20 cricket games have four: two on-field umpires, a third umpire who has access to video replays, and a fourth umpire who looks after the match balls.

When a ball is being bowled, one umpire (the bowler’s end umpire) stands behind the stumps at the non-striker’s end (that is, the end from which the ball is being bowled), which gives him a view straight down the pitch. The second (the striker’s end umpire) takes the position that he feels gives him the best view of the play. Through long tradition, this is usually square leg – in line with the popping crease and a few yards to the batsman’s leg side – hence he is sometimes known as the square leg umpire.

For certain decisions during a match, the on-field umpire may refer to the Third Umpire if there is one appointed, who has access to television replays. The Third Umpire is most often used in the case of run-outs, where the action is too fast for the naked eye but can be also used to decide the cases of disputed boundaries and catches, when the umpires cannot decide if the ball has struck the ground before being caught (but not to decide whether or not the ball in fact struck the bat or gloves of a batsman). Third Umpire referrals for LBW dismissals have also been trialled in the 2002 ICC Champions Trophy is Sri Lanka, and in the 2007 English Domestic Pro40 competition, and are currently being trialled in international matches.

During play, the umpire at the bowler’s end makes the decisions, which he mainly indicates, using arm movements. Some decisions must be instantaneous, whereas for others he may pause to think or discuss it with the square leg umpire, especially if the latter may have had a better view. If the umpire is unsure of a “line decision,” that is, a run out or stumped decision, or if the umpire is unsure that the ball is a four, six, or neither, he may refer the matter to the Third Umpire. The umpires may additionally refer decisions to the Third Umpire regarding Bump Balls and catches being taken cleanly (but only after the on-field umpires have consulted and both were unsighted).


About Konita Dcosta Innovator   I'm Authors

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Joined APSense since, May 29th, 2013, From Mumbai, India.

Created on Dec 31st 1969 19:00. Viewed 0 times.

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